For proof of how AT&T likes to breach out far and wide, you need not look past its line of phones. The phone carrier is known to offer mobile phones under its own brands, and has been doing so ever since the era of bricky keypad phones that give off a 19th century feel by now. Something tells us that the factories themselves don’t have the AT&T logo, but let’s not go there.

The AT&T 1070 4-Line Expandable Corded Phone System is yet another example of the carrier’s quest for market control, and it’s a pretty convoluted one. You might not expect a corded table phone to match a smartphone in terms of complexity, but that’s very much the case here. The 1070 was designed to lessen an office’s workload a bit by allowing secretaries (or you, if your business can’t afford one) to micromanage incoming calls with a few quick presses of a button.

Easy, huh? Not necessarily. 4 lines tend to mean 4 numbers, and while you aren’t forced to utilize the phone to its maximum, there’s still a good chance that using the 1070 even in a limited-functionality sense will leave you with a headache. Unless you have our AT&T 1070 manual, of course.

But why? Why would they make a phone that’s meant to make things easier on us only for it to be useless without a thorough reading of the instructions. Heck if we know. Manufacturers work in mysterious ways.

Where can I download the AT&T 1070 user manual in PDF format?

In truth, the 1070 isn’t that hard to use once you’ve gotten the hang of it. After you and your secretary have went through the AT&T 1070 user manual like responsible office participants, you’ll be forwarding calls, storing contacts and checking IDs for each individual line like it’s your second nature. Get the manual here, and become one with the phone system: http://sharedf.com/documentation/att-1070-owners-instruction-manual/