Samsung was aware of how much the Exynos 990 lagged behind Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 865 when it decided to equip this year’s Galaxy S20 models bound for its home country with foreign chips, which was a first for its domestic mobile business.

It barely even tried denying reports of a “humiliating” gap between the top Exynos- and Snapdragon-branded chips when those emerged earlier in the year. But none of that will necessarily stop it from launching yet another device series commanding a $1,000+ price in exchange for that same underwhelming performance most unremarkably remarkable for its average battery life, multitasking, and pretty much anything else you’d need a modern smartphone to do.

Samsung reluctant to cut its Exynos 990 losses in a year marked by losses

That is, at least, what the latest expeditions into the depths of the AOSP source code are reporting back as their first findings. Needless to say, the average person paying a grand for a smartphone isn’t really factoring the make and model of its SoC into their purchase decision. But seeing a well-funded company double down on what’s generally considered to be a rare example of one of its truly bad products – in a manner so deliberately discriminatory as Samsung seems to be doing with the Exynos 990 – is truly difficult to do if your starting position isn’t desperate to find evidence of anti-consumer behavior.

In straightforward terms, if you’re considering buying a Galaxy Note 20, Galaxy Fold 2, or any other future Samsung device equipped with the Exynos 990, don’t be that sucker paying anything close to the MSRP figure out of belief that “more expensive” somehow means “better”.